Posts tagged 1920s

So I guess Calvin’s dad wasn’t telling the truth after all?

So I guess it turns out that the world didn’t really turn color sometime in the 1930s?

This is from 1922, and is one of the earliest recordings ever of natural color on film. You can see it again now because technological civilization is awesome.

This clip is a very early, full-color Kodachrome film made by Kodak in 1922 to test new film stock and color processing. . . . The color and lighting are exquisite—all warm reds with flattering highlights—making it a purely enjoyable thing to watch. In 1922, for all its technical achievements, Kodak hadn’t yet done away with the flicker that gave movies one of their earliest and most enduring nicknames: the “flicks.” The flicker resulted from variations in film speed produced by the slow, hand-cranked cameras of the time and by variations in the density of the film itself . . . .

— Joan Neuberger, This 1922 Kodachrome Test Footage is Strangely Bewitching, in The Vault at Slate (February 8, 2013)

Monday Lazy Linking

<li><p><a href="">Mutual aid opportunity. Shawn P. Wilbur, <cite>Two-Gun Mutualism &amp; the Golden Rule</cite> (2011-05-06)</a>. <q>You'll find a new ChipIn widget in the sidebar of the blog (or on ChipIn), to support Laughing Horse Books, one of Portland, Oregon's few remaining independent bookstores, and a radical, collective-run bookstore/music venue/meeting space for 25 years now. All the little things that tend to snowball when a business...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2011-05-07.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">In Defense of Flogging - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education. <cite></cite> (2011-05-07)</a>. "Certainly my defense of flogging is more thought experiment than policy proposal. I do not expect to see flogging reinstated any time soon. And deep down, I wouldn't want to see it. And yet, in the course of writing what is, at its core, a quaintly retro abolish-prison book, I've come to see the benefits of wrapping a liberal argument in a conservative facade. If the notion of tying people to a rack and caning them on their behinds à la Singapore disturbs you, if it takes contemplating whipping to wake you up and to see prison for what it is, so be it! The passive moral high ground has gotten us nowhere." - Peter Moskos <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2011-05-07.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">Marie Curie. <cite></cite> (2011-05-08)</a>.  <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Monday 2011-05-09.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">Bin Laden reaction roundup. John, <cite></cite> (2011-05-08)</a>. <q>I have been much more interested in the various and sundry reactions, mainly from Americans, to Osama bin Laden’s killing than to the news itself. The whole situation ought to inspire quite a bit of mixed feelings from any libertarian, and even from any sensible, sympathetic human being. Notwithstanding the...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Monday 2011-05-09.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">Urban Airport of the Future (1926) Matt Novak, <cite>Paleofuture Blog</cite> (2011-05-07)</a>. <q>The fine people at Popular Mechanics recently published a book that deserves a prominent place on every retrofuturist's bookshelf. The Wonderful Future That Never Was by Gregory Benford looks at technological predictions that appeared in the pages of Popular Mechanics from 1903 until 1969. The prediction below was an attempt to...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Monday 2011-05-09.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">No Laissez Faire There. Sheldon Richman, <cite>The Freeman | Ideas On Liberty</cite> (2011-05-06)</a>. <q>(This article is based on remarks delivered at the meeting of the Association of Private Enterprise Education in April.) Friends of the free market tend to see the Gilded Age, roughly 1870-1890, as the closest thing in history to a laissez-faire economy. In some respects that is true — but...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Monday 2011-05-09.)</em></p></li>

Friday Lazy Linking

<li><p><a href="">What I want from a restaurant website. Matthew Inman, <cite>The Oatmeal - Comics, Quizzes, &amp; Stories</cite> (2011-02-08)</a>. <q>A list of things I'd like restaurant websites to provide.View</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Wednesday 2011-02-09.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">Tesla Predicts the Portable TV (1926) Matt Novak, <cite>Paleofuture Blog</cite> (2011-02-07)</a>. <q>In 1926 Nicola Tesla gave an interview to Collier's Weekly in which he predicted something that sounds remarkably like portable television. Perhaps most interestingly, he mentions that this technology would be used to watch war unfold, "just as though we were present." NEW YORK, Jan 25 - (AP) - Application...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Wednesday 2011-02-09.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">Kindlebility. Phil, <cite></cite> (2011-02-05)</a>. <q>In my attempts to find better ways of getting long-form content onto my Kindle to read offline, I’ve mainly been using two tools: Instapaper and the Later On Kindle Chrome extension. Instapaper has great formatting, and repeated delivery works like a new issue of a periodical, but as far as...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Wednesday 2011-02-09.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">Breaking the Web with hash-bangs. Isofarro, <cite>isolani: weblog</cite> (2011-02-08)</a>. <q>Update 10 Feb 2011: Tim Bray has written a much shorter, clearer and less technical explanation of the broken use of hash-bangs URLs. I thoroughly recommend reading and referencing it. Update 11 Feb 2011: Another very insightful (and balanced) response, this from Ben Ward (Hash, Bang, Wallop.) , great job...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Wednesday 2011-02-09.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">i&#39;ll tell you why the obama admin is shitting bricks right at. Captain Capitulation, <cite>eye of the storm</cite> (2011-02-10)</a>. <q>i&#39;ll tell you why the obama admin is shitting bricks right at this moment. they were hoping to preserve the whole damn thing - the military and intelligence establishments, the basic control of the population - minus mubarak, as politicians the world over like to believe that swapping symbols or...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Thursday 2011-02-10.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">Which Government Employees Cause More Harm:  Docs or Cops? cherylcline, <cite>der Blaustrumpf</cite> (2011-02-08)</a>. <q>Robin Hanson’s post today, “How Med Harms,” prompts me to ask whether docs or cops cause more harm and death.  Cops are a favorite target of liberals, anarchists, and some libertarians:  they’re of moderate status, usually of average intelligence, and they’re heavily and conspicuously armed in a country that equates...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Thursday 2011-02-10.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">Chamber of Corporatism. Jesse Walker, <cite>Jesse Walker: Reason Magazine articles and blog posts.</cite> (2011-02-07)</a>. <q>President Obama will be speaking today at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Tim Carney comments: This visit will spur a slew of articles on how Obama is &quot;tacking to the center,&quot; becoming more &quot;pro-business,&quot; and &quot;mending relationships.&quot; This will mostly be bunk. The president is still selling the same Big...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Thursday 2011-02-10.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="">Stuck in the Middle. Dorothy, <cite>Cat and Girl</cite> (2011-02-10)</a>.  <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Friday 2011-02-11.)</em></p></li>