Posts tagged Cheryl Cline

Friday Lazy Linking

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<li><p><a href="http://twitter.com/feministhulk/statuses/22731440679">feministhulk: SO MUCH HEGEMONY TO SMASH, SO LITTLE TIME! HULK OFTEN RELY HEAVILY ON DAY PLANNER, THOUGH TRY TO STAY FLEXIBLE. <cite>Twitter / feministhulk</cite> (2010-09-01)</a>. <q>feministhulk: SO MUCH HEGEMONY TO SMASH, SO LITTLE TIME! HULK OFTEN RELY HEAVILY ON DAY PLANNER, THOUGH TRY TO STAY FLEXIBLE.</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Wednesday 2010-09-01.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/reason/HitandRun/~3/m6wW8U4AUkI/concern-about-police-secrecy-t">Concern About Police Secrecy = "Tilting at Windmills"? Radley Balko, <cite>Hit &amp; Run</cite> (2010-09-01)</a>. <q>My column this week was about the continuing secrecy of Virginia's largest police departments and the way the state's law enforcement community is opposing efforts to make the departments even marginally more transparent. The journalist sounding the alarm about all of this is Michael Pope, who writes for Northern Virginia's...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Wednesday 2010-09-01.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://cherylcline.wordpress.com/2010/09/02/can-preschoolers-think/">Can Preschoolers Think? cherylcline, <cite>der Blaustrumpf</cite> (2010-09-02)</a>. <q>As I’ve said before, the NYT often shows up The Onion in terms of laughs.  This week, the NYT featured an unintentionally funny article about preschool depression accompanied by even funnier photos: Kiran didn’t seem like the type of kid parents should worry about. “He was the easy one,” his...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Thursday 2010-09-02.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/c4ss/~3/OL-PfrlK6Fo/3788">Social Individualism and Solidarity. Darian Worden, <cite>Center for a Stateless Society</cite> (2010-08-26)</a>. <q>A functional libertarian political order will rise the strongest from fertile ground. To maximize individual liberty it is necessary to promote the best kind of individualism at all levels. Controversy over the building of various mosques and the Park 51 Islamic cultural center shows the influence of anti-Muslim sentiment on...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Thursday 2010-09-02.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://libertarian-labyrinth.blogspot.com/2010/08/new-anarchist-platformist-archive.html">New Anarchist Platformist archive. Shawn P. Wilbur, <cite>Out of the Libertarian Labyrinth</cite> (2010-08-24)</a>. <q>Anarchism and the Platformist Tradition is a new archive with a nice collection of platformist texts, starting, naturally, with the 1926 Organisational Platform of the General Union of Anarchists (Draft), but including both prior and subsequent contributions to the platformist tradition. Whether or not you ultimately agree with the approaches...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Thursday 2010-09-02.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://libertarian-labyrinth.blogspot.com/2010/08/practical-support-for-microenterprise.html">Practical support for microenterprise. Shawn P. Wilbur, <cite>Out of the Libertarian Labyrinth</cite> (2010-08-24)</a>. <q>I've been featuring the 500 Friends of Reading Frenzy! Kickstarter project in the sidebar here since it was launched. It's now in its last week for funding, and 75% on its way to a goal of $5000. Reading Frenzy is a remarkable operation: a tiny shop which has been able...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Thursday 2010-09-02.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://libertarian-labyrinth.blogspot.com/2010/08/e-armand-gulf.html">E. Armand, &quot;The Gulf&quot; Shawn P. Wilbur, <cite>Out of the Libertarian Labyrinth</cite> (2010-08-08)</a>. <q>This short piece by Emile Armand appeared in Horace Traubel's The Conservator in 1910. It's an interesting piece to have appeared in a magazine dominated by the shadow of Walt Whitman—and an interesting example of Armand's thought.THE GULFAll the societies of the vanguard—Social Democrats, revolutionaries of all shades, various communists—say...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Thursday 2010-09-02.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://cherylcline.wordpress.com/2010/09/02/what-is-david-brooks-for">What is David Brooks for? <cite>der Blaustrumpf » What is David Brooks for?</cite> (2010-09-02)</a>. Vulture Economics (Cont'd): every mushroom cloud has a silver lining. <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Thursday 2010-09-02.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/c4ss/~3/KsmFKtHl4h4/3874">Some Hard Facts on Copyright. Kevin Carson, <cite>Center for a Stateless Society</cite> (2010-09-02)</a>. <q>I’ve referred to Nina Paley quite a bit in recent columns.  Her song “Copying is Not Theft” and her Mimi and Eunice cartoons skewer the moral pretensions of the Copyright Nazis more effectively than just about anything I’ve seen. In a more serious vein, I just ran onto her interview...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Thursday 2010-09-02.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://reason.com/archives/2010/09/02/the-ruling-class">The Ruling Class. Jesse Walker, <cite>Jesse Walker: Reason Magazine articles and blog posts.</cite> (2010-09-02)</a>. <q>Few essays attracted as much attention from right-wing readers this summer as &quot;America&#39;s Ruling Class—and the Perils of Revolution,&quot; an extended argument that an incestuous social set &quot;rules uneasily over the majority of Americans.&quot; Written by Angelo Codevilla of the Claremont Institute and first published in The American Spectator, this...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Friday 2010-09-03.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://blog.iblamethepatriarchy.com/2010/08/04/spinster-aunt-casts-jaundiced-eye-at-popular-television-show/">Spinster aunt casts jaundiced eye at popular television show. Jill, <cite>I Blame The Patriarchy</cite> (2010-08-04)</a>. <q>Hollywood has long been recognized by the Global Cabal of Spinster Aunts as Ground Zero for American misogyny. Like everything that gurgles forth from that foul city, this Mad Men sensation that’s sweeping the nation has many sicko antifeminist repercussions. Never heard of Mad Men? It’s a “critically acclaimed” —...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Friday 2010-09-03.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/arthurmag/~3/oSeBnTsCEKY/">Revolutionary Letter #4 by Diane di Prima. editor@arthurmag.com, <cite>ARTHUR MAGAZINE</cite> (2010-08-29)</a>. <q>Revolutionary Letter #4 by Diane di Prima Left to themselves people grow their hair. Left to themselves they take off their shoes. Left to themselves they make love sleep easily share blankets, dope &amp; children they are not lazy or afraid they plant seeds, they smile, they speak to one...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Friday 2010-09-03.)</em></p></li>

Monday Lazy Linking

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<li><p><a href="http://reason.com/blog/2010/04/02/somewhere-near-salinas">Somewhere Near Salinas. Jesse Walker, <cite>Jesse Walker: Reason Magazine articles and blog posts.</cite> (2010-04-02)</a>. <q>The editor of The Commoner, a website devoted to &quot;the commons-based society,&quot; travels to South America to study the co-ops that dominate the economy of Salinas, Ecuador. He finds an intricate mix of voluntary cooperation and entrepreneurship -- not the sort of combination that should befuddle a libertarian, but one...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Friday 2010-04-02.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://libertarian-labyrinth.blogspot.com/2010/04/mutualist-1-is-now-available.html">The Mutualist #1 is now available. Shawn P. Wilbur, <cite>Out of the Libertarian Labyrinth</cite> (2010-04-03)</a>. <q>The first issue of The Mutualist is now available for download, in pamphlet and non-pamphlet pdfs.</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-04-03.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://cherylcline.wordpress.com/2010/04/03/institutional-silencing/">Institutional Silencing. cherylcline, <cite>der Blaustrumpf</cite> (2010-04-03)</a>. <q>Bear with me as I take you through my thought process today.  I was directed to a blog post reviewing journalist Lori Gottlieb’s controversial but mostly sensible new book, “Marry Him!“, which claims that today’s young women are too picky and may wind up alone, and certainly with a shorter...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-04-03.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://cherylcline.wordpress.com/2010/04/04/the-war-on-kids-part-i-lost-count/">The War on Kids, Part…I Lost Count. <cite>der Blaustrumpf » Cultural, not Moral, Superiority</cite> (2010-04-05)</a>. State Government Vs. Entry-Level Employment Opportunities: "Often enough, these individuals were employed at nonprofits which would have promptly gone under had they paid their interns anything resembling a 'living wage.'  And usually these individuals got ahead at the organization by completing one of these internships.  ... The book is only being thrown at for-profit companies for now, but it isn’t hard to imagine that nonprofits might be next. ... Many nonprofits, and small or new for-profits, are only precariously afloat as is, especially with the recession, and even middle-class college kids are feeling pinched.  I suppose the usual suspects, the working- and lower-middle-classes, have already been sucked dry and the vampires have to turn to a new class.  I doubt many will recognize that this will hurt small businesses and idealistic college kids the most." <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Monday 2010-04-05.)</em></p></li>

Monday Lazy Linking

    <ul>
<li><p><a href="http://reason.com/blog/2010/04/02/somewhere-near-salinas">Somewhere Near Salinas. Jesse Walker, <cite>Jesse Walker: Reason Magazine articles and blog posts.</cite> (2010-04-02)</a>. <q>The editor of The Commoner, a website devoted to &quot;the commons-based society,&quot; travels to South America to study the co-ops that dominate the economy of Salinas, Ecuador. He finds an intricate mix of voluntary cooperation and entrepreneurship -- not the sort of combination that should befuddle a libertarian, but one...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Friday 2010-04-02.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://libertarian-labyrinth.blogspot.com/2010/04/mutualist-1-is-now-available.html">The Mutualist #1 is now available. Shawn P. Wilbur, <cite>Out of the Libertarian Labyrinth</cite> (2010-04-03)</a>. <q>The first issue of The Mutualist is now available for download, in pamphlet and non-pamphlet pdfs.</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-04-03.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://cherylcline.wordpress.com/2010/04/03/institutional-silencing/">Institutional Silencing. cherylcline, <cite>der Blaustrumpf</cite> (2010-04-03)</a>. <q>Bear with me as I take you through my thought process today.  I was directed to a blog post reviewing journalist Lori Gottlieb’s controversial but mostly sensible new book, “Marry Him!“, which claims that today’s young women are too picky and may wind up alone, and certainly with a shorter...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-04-03.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://cherylcline.wordpress.com/2010/04/04/the-war-on-kids-part-i-lost-count/">The War on Kids, Part…I Lost Count. <cite>der Blaustrumpf » Cultural, not Moral, Superiority</cite> (2010-04-05)</a>. State Government Vs. Entry-Level Employment Opportunities: "Often enough, these individuals were employed at nonprofits which would have promptly gone under had they paid their interns anything resembling a 'living wage.'  And usually these individuals got ahead at the organization by completing one of these internships.  ... The book is only being thrown at for-profit companies for now, but it isn’t hard to imagine that nonprofits might be next. ... Many nonprofits, and small or new for-profits, are only precariously afloat as is, especially with the recession, and even middle-class college kids are feeling pinched.  I suppose the usual suspects, the working- and lower-middle-classes, have already been sucked dry and the vampires have to turn to a new class.  I doubt many will recognize that this will hurt small businesses and idealistic college kids the most." <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Monday 2010-04-05.)</em></p></li>

When the State gives doctors power over their patients, the doctors’ primary loyalty will be to the power of the State, not to their patients

(Via Cheryl Cline @ der Blaustrumpf 2008-12-02: Trusting Doctors.)

The first step is that the State grants legal privileges to doctors. Or, more specifically, to those doctors who practice medicine according to the approaches favored by the government and government-backed medical guilds like the American Medical Association. These privileges for officially-approved doctors to force their competitors out of business with threats of fines, jail, or death, and thus to force captive patients to seek their services. In many countries, these privileges include a large apparatus of government-subsidized healthcare, in which government-approved doctors are paid largely, or entirely, by funds that the government has taken from unwilling taxpayers. (Healers whose practices are not officially approved by the government, obviously, receive none of these subsidies.) In some cases, they also involve the power of doctors — especially psychiatrists, or other doctors treating children, or treating adults labeled as insane or feeble-minded — to force invasive treatment on unwilling patients through the use of deception, threats, restraint, and, if necessary, outright violence.

When the government gives doctors this kind of unaccountable, legally-backed plenary power to control or coerce their patients, it converts the medical profession into a class of legally elevated and legally regulated mandarins, who expect and enjoy considerable political power through their legally-privileged professional associations and through the State apparatus itself. Since doctors enjoy special privileges over their patients, and depend on legal force rather than on their patients’ judgment to get their way, the legal privilege helps foster a culture of arrogance and entitlement. And at the same time it creates a situation where doctors depend on government power for their wealth and cultural prestige, since they depend on it to create an artificial scarcity of medical services, and to keep patients captive to the doctor’s preferred regimen. Moreover, whenever medical doctors get special political privileges over their patients, politics defines what will be counted as legitimate medicine, and so medical doctors necessarily become politicians, acting a minor faction of the ruling class, just by establishing professional standards. When those professional standards are enforced by law, State-approved doctors’ professional associations are transformed from voluntary associations into a branch of the government, and medicine is transformed from a service to the patient into an arm of State policy.

And whenever, wherever, and exactly to the extent that the State gives doctors this kind of power over their patients, and makes them instruments of State policy, State-privileged doctors will owe their primary loyalty to power of the State, not to their patients.

The results of that shift in loyalty will depend on the nature of the State that claims their loyalty. When a State is relatively restrained, or simply incompetent, doctors will still help their patients, for the most part, rather than hurting them. When a State becomes more predatory, or lethal, politically-privileged doctors will be called on to be fine-tuned instruments of the predation or the murder. Since they depend on the State, politically-privileged doctors will usually answer the call, even if it means subjecting their victim-patients to malpractice, torture, or murder. Indeed, since a more powerful and invasive hygienic or therapeutic State means more power and influence for politically-privileged doctors, many of them will not only side with and collaborate with a predatory or lethal State, but will actively urge it onwards toward ever greater atrocities, and beg to be given the responsibility for carrying them out.



As Yoel Abells, a Toronto family doctor and medical ethicist, said of the experience in Germany under the Third Empire, and America under the United States government’s Global War on Terror:

One fact Abells found particularly disturbing was that doctors joined the Nazi Party in greater numbers than other professionals.

Almost half of all doctors were members of the Nazi Party, he said, compared with only a quarter of lawyers or musicians, and to the 9 per cent of the German population as a whole.

Joining Nazi groups, he said, was intoxicating for many doctors because of the power over life and death it gave them.

Today, Abells said, a disturbing number of doctors continue to be involved in genocidal campaigns, terrorist organizations, torture and the interrogation of prisoners of war.

A report in the New England Journal of Medicine in September found that the U.S. Army continues to use doctors in its interrogation of suspected terrorists, despite every major medical association condemning the practice.

— Stuart Laidlaw, HealthZone.ca (2008-11-05): Medical atrocities did not end with Nazi era

As Cheryl Cline writes:

The collusion of the medical profession with the State is certainly nothing new. And sadly, it is not all that surprising. Intuitively, the public trusts its doctors and others perceived as public servants more than it trusts, say, its lawyers or ad men. (The popular TV show Mad Men is a perfect example of capitalization on our distrust of the capitalist-minded. Can you think of a show that would portray doctors in a similar light?) With so many people putting blind faith in government bureaucrats to foster the public good, it’s hardly surprising to see the two entities take advantage of the public’s trust to merge and consolidate power.

— Cheryl Cline, der Blaustrumpf (2008-12-02): Trusting Doctors

When doctors have this unchecked power to wreak torture or death on patients — whether it’s thrust upon them by an aggressive State, or whether they collaborate with an ambitious State to get it — then you will always get atrocities. And that’s an outrage. But it should not be a surprise. It is not an abuse of power; the power itself is the abuse, and doctors will always and everywhere sweep aside their ethical obligations to patients in favor of political obedience to the State, as long as it is State power rather than patients’ consent that determines what counts as legitimate medical practice, and as long as State privilege transforms medical practice from a consensual service into a forcibly-wielded instrument of public policy — which is to say, an instrument of State power. Sometimes it happens in little, obnoxious ways (under little, obnoxious legal regimes), and sometimes it happens in big, deadly ways (under big, deadly legal regimes), but it’s been going on for a long time now, and there’s no way around it. No way, that is, except genuine freed-market medicine, the only thing that can free the medical profession from the influence of State power and to make doctors accountable to patients rather than to power. No way, that is, except to abolish all forms of political command-and-control over the practice of medicine and to let doctors return to providing nothing more, and nothing less, than a consensual, life-affirming service to willing patients.

See also: