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Posts tagged George Orwell

Monday Lazy Linking

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<li><p><a href="http://reason.com/archives/2010/10/29/season-of-the-regulator">Season of the Regulator. Jesse Walker, <cite>Jesse Walker: Reason Magazine articles and blog posts.</cite> (2010-10-29)</a>. <q>If you&#39;re a kid, Halloween is a time to be scared of witches, werewolves, and the undead. If you&#39;re an adult, it&#39;s a time to be scared of child snatchers, serial killers, and easily offended members of the PTA. When children get frightened, they squeal, scream, or huddle under the...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-10-30.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/201x/2010/10/30/No-More-Users">No More Users. <cite>ongoing by Tim Bray</cite> (2010-10-30)</a>. <q>I just wrote a little piece about how to write software, and it contained a few references to the humans who carry the mobile devices on which the software runs, and who interact with it. I found myself referring to these individuals as β??usersβ? or β??the userβ?. Gack; I hate...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-10-30.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/GoldPrices/~3/CQy8DuNf3hQ/">Chart of the Week: Inflation in the Real World. Gold Prices, <cite>Gold Prices</cite> (2010-10-26)</a>. <q>By Jake Weber, Editor, The Casey Report As is often the case, there is a big difference between what the government statistics are reporting and whatβ??s going on in the real world. According to the most recent inflation reading published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), consumer prices grew...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-10-30.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://insteadofablog.wordpress.com/2010/10/25/grammar-as-virtue/">Grammar as Virtue. Neverfox, <cite>Anarchoblogs in English</cite> (2010-10-25)</a>. <q>Seen today on Facebook: [My] #1 grammatical pet peeve: when people say β??literallyβ? and itβ??s not, such as: β??walking into my room is like walking through a minefield, literally.β? Calling Hyacinth Bucket! To quote Charles Johnson at length (from another Facebook conversation in which he took me to task for...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-10-30.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/10/macbook-air-airport/">TSA Says 11-Inch MacBook Air Can Stay in Bag at Security Check. <cite>Daring Fireball</cite> (2010-10-31)</a>. "Wire: 'The Transportation Security Administration told CNN that the 11-inch Air, like the iPad, can stay inside bags when passing through the checkpoint. However, the TSA hasn't yet determined whether the 13-inch air can stay inside a bag or must be removed.' How can anyone argue this makes sense?" <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Sunday 2010-10-31.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://twitter.com/feministhulk/statuses/29323502601">feministhulk: HULK DRESS UP AS "REFUSAL TO ACKNOWLEDGE COMPLICITY BETWEEN PRIVILEGE AND OPPRESSION." SCARIEST THING HULK CAN THINK OF. <cite>Twitter / feministhulk</cite> (2010-10-31)</a>. <q>feministhulk: HULK DRESS UP AS "REFUSAL TO ACKNOWLEDGE COMPLICITY BETWEEN PRIVILEGE AND OPPRESSION." SCARIEST THING HULK CAN THINK OF.</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Sunday 2010-10-31.)</em></p></li>

Wednesday Lazy Linking

  • … but the streets belong to the people! Jesse Walker, Hit & Run (2009-06-10): The People’s Stop Sign. In which people in an Ottawa neighborhood take nonviolent direct action to slow down the traffic flying down their neighborhood streets — by putting up their own stop signs at a key intersection. The city government, of course, is now busy with a Criminal Investigation of the public’s heinous contribution to public safety.

  • Abolitionism is the radical notion that other people are not your property. Darian Worden (2009-06-09): The New Abolitionists The point is that the principles of abolitionism, which held that regardless of popular justifications no human is worthy to be master and no human can be owned by another, when carried to their logical conclusion require this: that no human is worthy of authority over another, and that no person is owed allegiance simply because of political status. When reason disassembles the popular justifications of statism, as advances in political philosophy since the 1850β??s have assisted in doing, the consistent abolitionist cannot oppose the voluntaryist principles of the Keene radicals.

  • Mr. Obama, Speak For Yourself. Thomas L. Knapp, Center for a Stateless Society (2009-09-09): Speaking of the State

  • A campaign of isolated incidents. Ellen Goodman, Houston Chronicle (2009-06-08): Sorry, but the doctor’s killer did not act alone

  • Let’s screw all the little guys. Just to be fair. (Or, pay me to advertise my product on your station.) Jesse Walker, Reason (2009-06-09): The Man Can’t Tax Our Music: The music industry wants to impose an onerous new fee on broadcasters.

  • Some dare call it torture. Just not the cops. Or the judges. Wendy McElroy, WendyMcElroy.com (2009-06-08): N.Y. Judge Rules that Police Can Taser Torture in order to coerce compliance with any arbitrary court order. I think that Wendy is right to call pain compliance for what it is — torture (as I have called it here before) — and that it is important to insist on this point as much as possible whenever the topic comes up.

  • On criminalizing compassion. Macon D., stuff white people do (2009-06-05), on the conviction of Walt Staton for knowingly littering water jugs in a wildlife refuge, in order to keep undocumented immigrants from dying in the desert.

  • Freed markets vs. deforesters. Keith Goetzman, Utne Reader Environment (2009-06-04): Do You Know Where Your Shoes Have Been?, on the leather industry and the destruction of the Amazon rainforest. Utne does a good job of pointing out (by quoting Grist’s Tom Philpott) that the problem is deeply rooted in multi-statist neoliberalism: because of the way in which the Brazilian government and the World Bank act together to subsidize the cattle barons and ‘roid up Brazilian cattle ranching, the report is really about the perils of using state policy to prop up global, corporate-dominated trade.

  • Well, Thank God. (Cont’d.) Thanks to the Lord Justice, we now know that Pringles are, in fact, officially potato chips, not mere savory snacks, in spite of the fact that only about 40% of a Pringles crisp is actually potato flour. Language Log takes this case to demonstrate the quasi-Wittgensteinian point that, fundamentalist legal philosophy to one side, there’s actually no such thing as a self-applying law. (Quoting Adam Cohen’s New York Times Op-Ed, Conservatives like to insist that their judges are strict constructionists, giving the Constitution and statutes their precise meaning and no more [linguists groan here], while judges like [Sonia] Sotermayor are activists. But there is no magic way to interpret terms like free speech or due process β?? or potato chip.) I think the main moral of the story has to do with the absurdity of a political system in which whether or not you can keep $160,000,000 of your own damn money rides on whether or not you can prove to a judge that your savory snack hasn’t got the requisite potatoness to count as a potato crisp for the purposes of law and justice.

  • Small riots will get small attention, no riots get no attention, make a big riot, and it will be handled immediately. Loretta Chao, Wall Street Journal (2009-05-30): In China, a New Breed of Dissidents. The story makes it seem as though the most remarkable thing about the emerging dissident movement is that they are safe enough for the State to tolerate them, rather than launching all out assaults as they did against the Tienanmen dissidents in 1989. Actually, I think that that misses the point entirely; and that the most interesting thing is that they have adopted such flexible and adaptive networking, both tactically and strategically, and that they now so often rise up from the very social classes that the Chinese Communist Party claims to speak for (not just easily-demonized students and intelligentsia, but ordinary farmers, factory workers, and retirees) — that the regime isn’t tolerating them; it just no longer knows what to do with them.

  • Counter-Cooking and Mutual Meals. Julia Levitt, Worldchanging: Bright Green (2009-06-03): Community Kitchens (Via Kevin Carson’s Shared Items.) If I may recommend, if you’re going to work on any kind of community cooking like this, particularly if you’re interested in it partly for reasons of resiliency and building community alternatives, you should do what you can to make sure that it is strongly connected with the local grey-market solidarity economy, through close cooperation with your local Food Not Bombs (as both a source and a destination for food) and other local alternatives to the state-subsidized corporate-consumer model for food distribution.

  • Looking Forward. Shawn Wilbur, In the Libertarian Labyrinth (009-06-06): Clement M. Hammond on Police Insurance. An excerpt on policing in a freed society, from individualist anarchist Clement M. Hammond’s futurist utopian novel, Then and Now which originally appeared in serialized form in Tucker’s Liberty in 1884 and 1885. (Thus predating Bellamy’s dreary Nationalist potboiler by 4 years.) Hammond’s novel is now available in print through Shawn’s Corvus Distribution. The good news is that, while Bellamy’s date of 2000 has already mercifully passed us by without any such society emerging, we still have almost 80 years to get it together in time for Hammond’s future.

  • Here at Reason we never pass up a chance to have some fun at the expense of Pete Seeger. Jesse Walker, Hit & Run (2009-06-09): They Wanna Hear Some American Music. On brilliant fakery, the invention of Country and Western music, the cult of authenticity, and the manufacture of Americana. For the long, full treatment see Barry Mazor, No Depression (2009-02-23): Americana, by any other name…

  • Anarchy on the Big Screen. Colin Firth and Kevin Spacey have signed on for a big-screen film adaptation of Homage to Catalonia. The film is supposed to enter production during the first half of 2010.

Technological civilization is awesome. (Cont’d.)

Communications

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