Posts tagged Hurricane Katrina

Monday Lazy Linking

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<li><p><a href="http://www.thefreemanonline.org/columns/not-so-fast/new-orleans-victim-of-government-neglect/">New Orleans: Victim of Government Neglect? William L. Anderson, <cite>The Freeman | Ideas On Liberty</cite> (2010-08-31)</a>. <q>Five years ago Hurricane Katrina, a massive Category 3 storm, hit the Gulf Coast region, destroying property, killing nearly 2,000 people, and leaving damage that still dots the landscape. Although the brunt of the storm hit the Mississippi coast, Katrina is best-known for the flooding of New Orleans, which happened...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-09-04.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://jed.jive.com/2010/08/turking-the-idea-and-some-implications/">Turking!  The idea and some implications. Jed, <cite>Anomalous Presumptions</cite> (2010-08-26)</a>. <q>I recently read an edited collection of five stories, Metatropolis; the stories are set in a common world the authors developed together. This is a near future in which nation state authority has eroded and in which new social processes have grown up and have a big role in making...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-09-04.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://reason.com/archives/2010/08/30/the-golden-age-of-comic-book-c">The Golden Age of Comic Books. Brian Doherty, <cite>Brian Doherty: Reason Magazine articles and blog posts.</cite> (2010-08-30)</a>. <q>Ben Schwartz’s edited volume The Best American Comics Criticism is the first attempt to anthologize and build a canon of short-form history, journalism, and criticism about comics, and it does a fine job. It also self-consciously marks the beginning of a fresh era in acceptance and achievement for non-genre works...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-09-04.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://reason.com/blog/2010/08/06/measuring-blood-on-hands-in-th">Measuring Blood on Hands in the Wikileaks Controversy. Brian Doherty, <cite>Brian Doherty: Reason Magazine articles and blog posts.</cite> (2010-08-06)</a>. <q>Tom Englehardt questions Joint Chief of Staff Chair Mike Mullen&#39;s accusations that Wikileaks has blood on their hands because info they leaked could lead people to kill Afghan informants or American soliders. Some excerpts on why Mullen might not be the best spokesman for that position of scrupulous moral responsibility...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-09-04.)</em></p></li>
<li><p><a href="http://reason.com/blog/2010/09/03/teen-shot-dead-by-police-in-no">Noise Complaint Leads to Police Shooting, Killing 17-Year-Old. Radley Balko, <cite>Radley Balko: Reason Magazine articles and blog posts.</cite> (2010-09-03)</a>. <q>Last Sunday night, police in Morganton, North Carolina shot and killed 17-year-old Michael Sipes. The officers were responding to a noise complaint called in by a neighbor in the mobile home park where Sipes lived. His mother says there were three children in the home on the night Sipes was...</q> <em style="font-size: smaller">(Linked Saturday 2010-09-04.)</em></p></li>

State of emergency

Border laws kill.

In a recent post, Stentor does a good job of explaining one of the (many) reasons why.

Second [of a couple immigration-related stories] is Border Patrol’s declaration and half-hearted not-quite-retraction of a policy of checking immigration status during natural disaster evacuations. The result is to make many Latin@s — including those with legal status up to natural-born citizen — reluctant to evacuate, either because they fear consequences for themselves (if I flee my house without my passport, I still have my skin and my accent, but others don’t have those advantages), or because of the consequences for their family and community members. So not only are people being unnecessarily exposed to natural disasters, they’re also being set up so they can be blamed for choosing to stay behind a la the poor black non-evacuees during Katrina. This links in to the sanctuary cities and Sheriff Joe issue in terms of making every occasion an occasion for checking people’s status, regardless of whether such singleminded focus on immigration enforcement undermines the government’s other duties. It also reveals an important aspect of disaster management — disasters intensify people’s interactions with the State. Complying with disaster management plans puts you in direct contact with police, the national guard, and other direct agents of state coercion, whereas failure to comply puts you wholly outside their protection (or even in direct opposition to them, as a possible looter). This would be fine, even beneficial, if you are on good terms with the state — if you trust it to be acting in your best interests. For people who have a longstanding antagonistic relationships with the state, however — such as people of color and immigrants — natural disasters are a prime occasion for the state to increase its pernicious interference. And all of this applies not just to the immediate disaster management (evacuation, etc.) but also to the longer-term recovery process.

— Stentor, debitage (2008-06-10): Deporting Valedictorians And Hurricane Evacuees

Read the whole thing.

(Via comments on feministe 2008-06-15.)